Workshop - Exploring Multi-sector Approaches to Tuberculosis (TB) Elimination
The NCC for Infectious Diseases (NCCID), with support from the NCCs for Aboriginal Health (NCCAH), Determinants of Health (NCCDH), and Healthy Public Policy (NCCHPP), hosted an in-person event to learn about the historical context and lived experience of those infected and affected by TB, and explore collaborative opportunities to end TB in the north. The NCCHPP's Val Morrison co-hosted a workshop with the NCCDH's Dianne Oickle to explore multi-sector approaches to TB elimination.
Published in May 2018. Description. Download  773 K
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This joint Knowledge Exchange Forum entitled: Towards TB Elimination in Northern Indigenous Communities was held in Winnipeg, from January 31 - February 1, 2018.

The forum convened Indigenous and non-Indigenous stakeholders working on TB from the Northwest Territories, Nunavut, northern British Columbia, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, northern Québec, and Newfoundland and Labrador.

It built upon the relationships and knowledge exchange developed in previous years. Medical officers of health and provincial & territorial public health units had previously highlighted the significant challenges and conditions that have hindered improvements in TB in their northern communities.

The co-led workshop by Val Morrison and Dianne Oickle allowed for concrete discussions of whole government approaches to address the inequities and determinants to improve TB outcomes for northern residents.

The objectives of the workshop were:

  • To consider the potential of multi-sectoral approaches to addressing TB determinants and moving towards TB elimination

  • To explore possible types of multi-sectoral collaboration and their potential in context.

Exploring Multi-sector Approaches to Tuberculosis (TB) Elimination
27 slides
 773 K

 First page of the presentation - click to download.

To learn more about the other workshops and presentations from the Forum, visit the collective NCCPH website.
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The production of the NCCHPP website has been made possible through a financial contribution from the Public Health Agency of Canada.